Edouard Manet “Quotes” | French Painter (1832-1883)

June 7, 2009

Color is a matter of taste and of sensitivity.

Black is not a color.

It is not enough to know your craft – you have to have feeling. Science is all very well, but for us imagination is worth far more.

No one can be a painter unless he cares for painting above all else.

I need to work to feel well.

I would kiss you, had I the courage.

Insults are pouring down on me as thick as hail.

The attacks of which I have been the object have broken the spring of life in me… People don’t realize what it feels like to be constantly insulted.

There are no lines in nature, only areas of colour, one against another.

There is only one true thing: instantly paint what you see. When you’ve got it, you’ve got it. When you haven’t, you begin again. All the rest is humbug.

This woman’s work is exceptional. Too bad she’s not a man.

You would hardly believe how difficult it is to place a figure alone on a canvas, and to concentrate all the interest on this single and universal figure and still keep it living and real.

Biography
Édouard Manet (French pronunciation: [edwaʁ manɛ]), 23 January 1832 – 30 April 1883), was a French painter. One of the first nineteenth century artists to approach modern-life subjects, he was a pivotal figure in the transition from Realism to Impressionism.

Read more about Édouard Manet on Wikipedia.org

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