Eugene Delacroix “Quotes” | French Romantic Artist (1798-1863)

June 7, 2009

Eugene Delacroix “Quotes”

A taste for simplicity cannot endure for long.

Do all the work you can; that is the whole philosophy of the good way of life.

Do not be troubled for a language, cultivate your soul and she will show herself.

If one considered life as a simple loan, one would perhaps be less exacting. We possess actually nothing; everything goes through us.

Nature is a dictionary; one draws words from it.

Talent does whatever it wants to do. Genius does only what it can.

The artist who aims at perfection in everything achieves it in nothing.

What moves those of genius, what inspires their work is not new ideas, but their obsession with the idea that what has already been said is still not enough.

Biography
Ferdinand Victor Eugène Delacroix (26 April 1798 – 13 August 1863) was a French Romantic artist regarded from the outset of his career as the leader of the French Romantic school.[1] Delacroix’s use of expressive brushstrokes and his study of the optical effects of colour profoundly shaped the work of the Impressionists, while his passion for the exotic inspired the artists of the Symbolist movement. A fine lithographer, Delacroix illustrated various works of William Shakespeare, the Scottish writer Sir Walter Scott and the German writer Johann Wolfgang von Goethe.

Read more about Eugène Delacroix on Wikipedia.org

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