Joseph Albers “Quotes” | Modern Artist (1888-1976)

June 8, 2009

Joseph Albers “Quotes”
In my basic courses I have always tried to develop discovery and invention which, in my opinion, are the criteria of creativeness.

The role of art for me is the visualization of attitude, of the human attitude towards life, towards the world. And I think I’ve said before that there is no difference between science and art when it comes to creativeness, productiveness, to come to conclusions and to formulations. That’s the same I think. And scientists can be just as creative as an artist.

I do not like to be a prophet. I like better to paint than to predict what the next painters will do. Though I have a feeling that consideration of order is very much in the air.

Good teaching is more a giving of right questions than a giving of right answers.

Well, I would say the aim of art is a constant, and a continuous job to reveal visually the attitude of our mentality. And the less we disturb the influence of our mentality the more I believe we come close to the truth.

Abstraction is real, probably more real than nature.

I have also come to the conclusion that the square is a human invention, which makes it sympathetic to me. Because you don’t see it in nature. As we do not see squares in nature, I thought that it is man-made. But I have corrected myself. Because squares exist in salt crystals, our daily salt. We know this because we can see it in the microscope.

In order to make a resume, the meaning of art is: learn to see and to feel life; that is, cultivate imagination, because there are still marvels in the world, because life is a mystery and always will be. But be aware of it. Therefore art means: you have to believe, to have faith, that is, cultivate vision.

Art problems are problems of human relationship.

Joseph Albers Biography
Josef Albers (March 19, 1888 – March 25, 1976) was a German-born American artist and educator whose work, both in Europe and in the United States, formed the basis of some of the most influential and far-reaching art education programs of the 20th century.

Read more about Joseph Albers on Wikipedia.org

Browse the Index for more great “The Art Student” resources

Bookmark and Share

Advertisements
%d bloggers like this: