Are you interested in learning the basics of watercolor, though don’t really want to paint fruit? MakingArtFun.com has created a series of free printable watercolor lesson plans that apply basic skills in the creation of fun easy-to-paint characters and scenes. This website even provides you with a printable version of the drawing if you’d like to get right to painting. Cut your watercolor paper to 8.5″ x 11″ and print.

Here they are in all their kookiness:

The Little Engine That Could | “Learn to Watercolor” Project

The Little Engine That Could | Watercolor Lesson

“Make a Wish” Fairy | “Learn to Watercolor” Project

"Make a Wish" Fairy | Watercolor on the Funny Side of the Brain

Monkey Loves Banana | “Learn to Watercolor” Project

Monkey Loves Banana | Watercolor on the Funny Side of the Brain

Happy Kindergartener | “Learn to Watercolor” Project

Happy Kindergartener  | Watercolor on the Funny Side of the Brain

Retro Robot | “Learn to Watercolor” Project

Robot | Watercolor on the Funny Side of the Brain

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Browse other “The Art Student” watercolor painting posts:

Artist Masterwork Watercolor Projects for Kids
Watercolor: How to Hold a Paint Brush

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The Academy of Art University offers a wonderful online video tutorial on the basics of drawing a person’s head from a front view. They take you through understanding the proportions of the head, pencil, paper and eraser types (so your trip to the art store is not so confusing), facial features and expressions.

How to Draw a Face | Video Tutorial from Academy of Art University

 

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Watercolor paints can be purchased in several forms: dry pans, (traditional childrens watercolor sets) small colored cakes (just add water), or moist tubes, that look like oil paint tubes.

In whatever form you choose to purchase your paints, moist or dry, you typically arrange them in a palette that has paint wells for your pure colors, and plenty of space for mixing paints.

If you are just getting started, a watercolor set is a great choice. A nice intermediate kit is the Grumbacher Academy Watercolor Set that includes 10 tubes of paint. Another budget minded choice would be the Winsor & Newton Cotman Deluxe Watercolor Studio Set which includes 12 color tubes and mixing trays.

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A brush is made up of bristles at one end, a ferrule (the metal thingy than connects the bristles to the handle), and the handle.

The typical watercolor brushes have long hairs to absorb the water. Brushes made of sable hair are considered the very best because of their exceptional ability to draw to a point and hold water.  They are also the most expensive. Beginners typically purchase synthetic or part sable brushes. The Kolinsky red sable brush is considered to be the best. These brushes are manufactured by several of different companies, including Arches Kolinsky brushes and Escoda Kolinsky brushes. Other brand name brushes include Grumbacher, Isabey, DaVinci, Rosemary and Co., and Raphael.

Most every brush can be divided into two categories: flat or round. Round brushes have a cone shape, with bristles that come to a point. Flat brushes are round brushes squashed flat, with the ends squared off. This type of brush is a bit stiffer. Round brushes are numbered from smallest (000 – the tiny ones) to largest (20- the big fat ones). Flat brushes are measured in inches.

A size 0 round brush will have a very fine point with very few bristles. You paint the very small stuff with this one. A collection of 3 or 4 quality brushes of different sizes should serve you well. A good beginner set might include one of two round brushes –  8 and 14. A 1/2″ and 1″ flat wash brush will round out your collection well.

If you really want to go basic, buy a no.8  round brush (natural hair or synthetic) and paint small. You’ll be able to get a feel for the brush and acquire some basic skills. If you still like watercolor painting after you have filled up you first pad of paper, you can buy a few more brushes – and of course another pad of paper.

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Browse other “The Art Student” related posts:

Picasso for Kids: Free Lessons Plans and Printable Worksheets
Soap Sculpture | 3 Easy Projects for Kids
Great Artist Biographies for Kids
Watercolor Terms | Free Printable Word Search Worksheet
Drawing Terms | Free Printable Word Search Worksheet
Free Art Masterpiece Coloring Pages
Free Bible Coloring Pages

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Sorting through the vast array or watercolor books for the beginner can be difficult when you don’t know what is good and what isn’t.

A few recommended books include:

Watercolor for the Serious Beginner by Mary Whyte
The Art of Watercolor, by Charles le Clair
Watercolor Basic, Let’s Get Started by Jack Reid

For the kid at heart, check out Watercolor for the Artistically Undiscovered by Thacher Hurd and John Cassidy. This Klutz book includes a paint set, brush and plenty of watercolor paper to experiment. Lot’s of fun!

You should be able to find these book on Amazon.com for around $10-$20. You can also check out your local library. It’s a great resource for those folks that would like to keep there investment small until they find out if they even like watercolor.

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