Auguste Rodin “Quotes”
The sculptor represents the transition from one pose to another.. he indicates how insensibly the first glides into the second. In his work we still see a part of what was and we discover a part of what is to be.

It is the artist who is truthful and it is photography which lies, for in reality time does not stop, and if the artist succeeds in producing the impression of a movement which takes several moments for accomplishment, his work is certainly much less conventional than the scientific image, where time is abruptly suspended.

Art is contemplation. It is the pleasure of the mind which searches into nature and which there divines the spirit of which Nature herself is animated.

Recently I have taken to isolating limbs, the torso. Why am I blamed for it? Why is the head allowed and not portions of the body? Every part of the human figure is expressive.

The artist must create a spark before he can make a fire and before art is born, the artist must be ready to be consumed by the fire of his own creation.

Auguste Rodin Biography
Auguste Rodin (born François-Auguste-René Rodin; 12 November 1840 – 17 November 1917) was a French artist, most famous as a sculptor. He was the preeminent French sculptor of his time, and remains one of the few sculptors widely recognized outside the visual arts community.

Read more about Auguste Rodin on Wikipedia.org

Browse the Index for more great “The Art Student” resources

Bookmark and Share

Advertisements

Jean Arp “Quotes”
I wanted to create new appearances, to extract new forms from man.

Art is a fruit that grows in man, like a fruit on a plant, or a child in its mother’s womb.

All things, and man as well, should be like nature, without measure.

Jean Arp Biography
Jean Arp / Hans Arp (16 September 1886 – 7 June 1966) was a German-French sculptor, painter, poet and abstract artist in other media such as torn and pasted paper.

Read more about Jean Arp on Wikipedia.org

Browse the Index for more great “The Art Student” resources

Bookmark and Share

Marcel Duchamp “Quotes”
Chess can be described as the movement of pieces eating one another.

The creative act is not performed by the artist alone; the spectator brings the work in contact with the external world by deciphering and interpreting its inner qualifications and thus adds his contribution to the creative act.

I have forced myself to contradict myself in order to avoid conforming to my own taste.

Living is more a question of what one spends than what one makes.

I am interested in ideas, not merely in visual products.

I am still a victim of chess. It has all the beauty of art – and much more. It cannot be commercialized. Chess is much purer than art in its social position.

I don’t believe in art. I believe in artists.

The individual, man as a man, man as a brain, if you like, interests me more than what he makes, because I’ve noticed that most artists only repeat themselves.

Marcel Duchamp Biography
Marcel Duchamp (28 July 1887 – 2 October 1968), pronounced [maʀsɛl dyˈʃɑ̃]) was a French artist whose work is most often associated with the Dadaist and Surrealist movements. Duchamp’s output influenced the development of post-World War I Western art. He advised modern art collectors, such as Peggy Guggenheim and other prominent figures, thereby helping to shape the tastes of Western art during this period.

Read more about Marcel Duchamp on Wikipedia.org

Browse the Index for more great “The Art Student” resources

Bookmark and Share

Georges Rouault “Quotes”
The artist discards all theories, both his own and those of others. He forgets everything when he is in front of his canvas.

The conscience of an artist worthy of the name is like an incurable disease which causes him endless torment but occasionally fills him with silent joy.

A tree against the sky possesses the same interest, the same character, the same expression as the figure of a human.

For me, painting is a way to forget life. It is a cry in the night, a strangled laugh.

I am a believer and a conformist.

My only objective is to paint a Christ so moving that those who see him will be converted.

Nothing is old, nothing is new, save the light of grace underneath which beats a human heart. The way of feeling, of understanding, of loving; the way of seeing the country, the faces that your father saw, that your mother knew. The rest is chimerical.

Often pagans, with their eyes wide open, do not see very clearly.

Subjective artists are one-eyed, but objective artists are blind.

Georges Rouault Biography
Georges Henri Rouault (27 May 1871 – 13 February 1958) was a French Fauvist and Expressionist painter, and printmaker in lithography and etching.

Read more about Georges Rouault on Wikipedia.org

Browse the Index for more great “The Art Student” resources

Bookmark and Share

George Braque “Quotes”

Once an object has been incorporated in a picture it accepts a new destiny.

Painting is a nail to which I fasten my ideas.

Reality only reveals itself when it is illuminated by a ray of poetry.

Painting is a nail to which I fasten my ideas.

There is only one valuable thing in art: the thing you cannot explain.

To define a thing is to substitute the definition for the thing itself.

Truth exists; only lies are invented.

George Braque Biography
Georges Braque (13 May 1882 – 31 August 1963) was a major 20th century French painter and sculptor who, along with Pablo Picasso, developed the art movement known as cubism.

Read more about George Braque on Wikipedia.org

Browse the Index for more great “The Art Student” resources

Bookmark and Share

Camille Pissarro “Quotes”
Blessed are they who see beautiful things in humble places where other people see nothing.

At fifty, that is in 1880, I formulated the idea of unity, without being able to render it. At sixty, I am beginning to see the possibility of rendering it.

Cover the canvas at the first go, then work at it until you see nothing more to add.

Don’t be afraid in nature: one must be bold, at the risk of having been deceived and making mistakes.

Everything is beautiful, all that matters is to be able to interpret.

God takes care of imbeciles, little children and artists.

I began to understand my sensations, to know what I wanted, at around the age of forty – but only vaguely.

I regard it as a waste of time to think only of selling: one forgets one’s art and exaggerates one’s value.

Observe that it is a great error to believe that all mediums of art are not closely tied to their time.

Paint the essential character of things.

When you do a thing with your whole soul and everything that is noble within you, you always find your counterpart.

Work at the same time on sky, water, branches, ground, keeping everything going on an equal basis… Don’t be afraid of putting on colour… Paint generously and unhesitatingly, for it is best not to lose the first impression.

I remember that, although I was full of fervour, I didn’t have the slightest inkling, even at forty, of the deeper side to the movement we were pursuing by instinct. It was in the air!

I sometimes have a horrible fear of turning up a canvas of mine. I’m always afraid of finding a monster in place of the precious jewels I thought I had put there!

It is absurd to look for perfection.

It is only by drawing often, drawing everything, drawing incessantly, that one fine day you discover to your surprise that you have rendered something in its true character.

Camille Pissarro Biography
Camille Pissarro (July 10, 1830 – November 13, 1903) was a French Impressionist painter. His importance resides not only in his visual contributions to Impressionism and Post-Impressionism, but also in his patriarchal standing among his colleagues, particularly Paul Cézanne and Paul Gauguin.

Read more about Camille Pissarro on Wikipedia.org

Browse the Index for more great “The Art Student” resources

Bookmark and Share

Eugene Delacroix “Quotes”

A taste for simplicity cannot endure for long.

Do all the work you can; that is the whole philosophy of the good way of life.

Do not be troubled for a language, cultivate your soul and she will show herself.

If one considered life as a simple loan, one would perhaps be less exacting. We possess actually nothing; everything goes through us.

Nature is a dictionary; one draws words from it.

Talent does whatever it wants to do. Genius does only what it can.

The artist who aims at perfection in everything achieves it in nothing.

What moves those of genius, what inspires their work is not new ideas, but their obsession with the idea that what has already been said is still not enough.

Biography
Ferdinand Victor Eugène Delacroix (26 April 1798 – 13 August 1863) was a French Romantic artist regarded from the outset of his career as the leader of the French Romantic school.[1] Delacroix’s use of expressive brushstrokes and his study of the optical effects of colour profoundly shaped the work of the Impressionists, while his passion for the exotic inspired the artists of the Symbolist movement. A fine lithographer, Delacroix illustrated various works of William Shakespeare, the Scottish writer Sir Walter Scott and the German writer Johann Wolfgang von Goethe.

Read more about Eugène Delacroix on Wikipedia.org

Browse the Index for more great “The Art Student” resources

Bookmark and Share

%d bloggers like this: